LETTERS TO THE EDITOR 2 – August 2009

LETTERS TO THE EDITOR

 

mail-box-full-colorDear Sir: 

Firstly, I apologize, I don’t have access to a computer, but felt compelled to write to you about Mr. Bill Frayer’s article—“Uncommon Sense—When expert opinion is questionable,” (July 2009, El Ojo del Lago, P: 14, 15.)

As a Canadian, and a physician who lived in the Ajijic area and worked in family practice and emergency medicine for a number of years, I know the importance of trust and clinical security one must have in his or her physician on clinical guidance. Mr. Frayer wrote an excellent and thought-provoking article about his personal medical and his personal challenge as a patient.

Happy to read, it worked out as a physician trained in clinical practice—undergraduate M.D. Mexico, post grad US internships, I know how personally frustrating and psychologically debilitating it is for a physician to make the wrong clinical decision for his or her patients.

Medicine is vast and each physician has their own expertise in medicine, and yet all of us have made mistakes in our clinical judgments including myself. In the same July issue, P.52, “A New Lease—On Life,” by Judit Rajhathy, “Many are Nutrionally, Not Medically Ill,” is an outstanding medical article.

We as consumers, she states, must take responsibility for our, own health. Judit is right on the money about our health care—the key is preventive medicine through diet and exercise. We look after our investments, homes, etc., and yet we spend little investment in preventive medicine, until we become sick.

Lakeside is so very fortunate in physicians and health care providers in preventive medicine. I have been reading your excellent magazine for years and have read countless testimonials about outstanding physicians, some trained in the U.S. I remember reading Victoria Schmidt’s articles on how much she admired Mexican medicine.

Some feel it is superior to the U.S and Canada according to your writers. I have had the privilege as a Canadian working in Canada, USA and México in the emergency medical services, it doesn’t matter where you train it is your responsibility to treat patients as you would liked to have been treated in medicine.

Remember the golden rule in medicine, a good oral history and clinical exam are the most important foundations in medicine, not just ordering a large amount of tests. Take charge of your life and health care, don’t be afraid to challenge your physician, ask for a consult if you are not happy about your diagnosis. Research your illness; learn all you can about it. Start exercise, eating right; it is never too late. Stop smoking, cut back on alcohol, assess all your medications.

LCS is another network of excellent medical resources and health lectures. This is an outstanding organization of medical advice—while living in México over the years I had the honor and privilege to give many lectures in family practice and emergency medicine. As Judit Rajhathy stated in her article, we only have one body—treat it with care and respect, eat right, exercise. As I now think about my first day of medical school my professor quoted from the father of medicine. Hippocrates —“Life so short, the craft so long to learn. Stay healthy and spiritual in mind and body.”

Respectfully,

Dr. Brian W. Jones, B.A; B.E.D; O.C.T; M.D.

(A.C.L.S, Canada)

Family/Emergency Practice México

drilau@yahoo.com

Dear Sir:
Firstly, I apologize, I don’t have access to a computer, but felt compelled to write to you about Mr. Bill Frayer’s article—“Uncommon Sense—When expert opinion is questionable,” (July 2009, El Ojo del Lago, P: 14, 15.)
As a Canadian, and a physician who lived in the Ajijic area and worked in family practice and emergency medicine for a number of years, I know the importance of trust and clinical security one must have in his or her physician on clinical guidance. Mr. Frayer wrote an excellent and thought-provoking article about his personal medical and his personal challenge as a patient.
Happy to read, it worked out as a physician trained in clinical practice—undergraduate M.D. Mexico, post grad US internships, I know how personally frustrating and psychologically debilitating it is for a physician to make the wrong clinical decision for his or her patients.
Medicine is vast and each physician has their own expertise in medicine, and yet all of us have made mistakes in our clinical judgments including myself. In the same July issue, P.52, “A New Lease—On Life,” by Judit Rajhathy, “Many are Nutrionally, Not Medically Ill,” is an outstanding medical article.
We as consumers, she states, must take responsibility for our, own health. Judit is right on the money about our health care—the key is preventive medicine through diet and exercise. We look after our investments, homes, etc., and yet we spend little investment in preventive medicine, until we become sick.
Lakeside is so very fortunate in physicians and health care providers in preventive medicine. I have been reading your excellent magazine for years and have read countless testimonials about outstanding physicians, some trained in the U.S. I remember reading Victoria Schmidt’s articles on how much she admired Mexican medicine.
Some feel it is superior to the U.S and Canada according to your writers. I have had the privilege as a Canadian working in Canada, USA and México in the emergency medical services, it doesn’t matter where you train it is your responsibility to treat patients as you would liked to have been treated in medicine.
Remember the golden rule in medicine, a good oral history and clinical exam are the most important foundations in medicine, not just ordering a large amount of tests. Take charge of your life and health care, don’t be afraid to challenge your physician, ask for a consult if you are not happy about your diagnosis. Research your illness; learn all you can about it. Start exercise, eating right; it is never too late. Stop smoking, cut back on alcohol, assess all your medications.
LCS is another network of excellent medical resources and health lectures. This is an outstanding organization of medical advice—while living in México over the years I had the honor and privilege to give many lectures in family practice and emergency medicine. As Judit Rajhathy stated in her article, we only have one body—treat it with care and respect, eat right, exercise. As I now think about my first day of medical school my professor quoted from the father of medicine. Hippocrates —“Life so short, the craft so long to learn. Stay healthy and spiritual in mind and body.”
Respectfully,
Dr. Brian W. Jones, B.A; B.E.D; O.C.T; M.D.
(A.C.L.S, Canada)
Family/Emergency Practice México
drilau@yahoo.com
Ojo Del Lago
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